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Posted by on Oct 13, 2019 in Art, Work | 1 comment

The Way of Nature, The Way of Grace – Tree of Life

The Way of Nature, The Way of Grace – Tree of Life

Recently I attended an event on faith and the arts. Erik Lokkesmoe of Aspiration Entertainment told a moving story. A secular journalist who had recently seen Terrence Malick’s film “The Tree of Life,” bluntly told him, “I call bullshit on all churches who don’t send busloads of their people to see this movie.” We then sat, about 90 of us, in a small art studio in Denver and watched the clip above from the opening monologue. Since then, I’ve watched it about 10 times. I pause. I listen. And I’ve been ruminating on the quote below. Do I live the way of nature or the way of grace? Do I accept slights, or do I look out for just myself? As I repeatedly watch this, I feel something heal inside me. I offer this clip and quote to you here for your own reflection. “The nuns taught us there are two ways through life, the way of Nature and the way of Grace. You have to choose which one...

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Posted by on Aug 26, 2013 in Theology | 2 comments

The Way of Nature, The Way of Grace

The Way of Nature, The Way of Grace

  What really makes the work of Christians any different from the work of anybody else? Or put another way – how could we distinguish between the daily work of a Christian versus that of, say, a Muslim, secular humanist, Buddhist, or religious pluralist? Would we (or should we?) see a difference? Some would say the actual work would be no different; work would just be done with a different motivation (a view I’ve disagreed with on this blog). Others would boil it down to the “three e’s”: excellence, ethics, and evangelism. However, I think there’s a problem with making these the distinguishing marks of the Christian’s work. First, as best as I can tell, secularists, Muslims and other non-believers care about excellence just as much as Christians. They may do so out of the wrong motives – but nonetheless, I’ve often been amazed at the art, business structures, or literary achievements of my peers from other faith. How about ethics? Again, I think there’s much truth in saying...

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