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Posted by on Jan 4, 2018 in Economy, Politics, Theology | 0 comments

Loving Faithful Institutions: The Building Blocks of a Just Global Society (From Comment Magazine)

Loving Faithful Institutions: The Building Blocks of a Just Global Society (From Comment Magazine)

  Occasionally I’ll post on this blog an article I really like. And I really like this one by Dr. Jonathan Chaplin, who’s on the divinity faculty at Cambridge University. It’s about an unpopular topic that should be popular: the importance of institutions. One of my convictions at the founding of DIFW was that in order to change the conversation about faith and public life in Denver, we needed not just an event or a “network” – we needed an institution that can last for years, decades…generations. And that meant doing things like admin work, building a board, building long-term relationships, writing emails, and zillions of other unsexy tasks.   Happy reading – and I hope you’ll commit yourself to building strong, healthy institutions as well.  Postmodern Christians won’t get very far in transforming society until they learn to love institutions again. Institutions and organizations are out; networks and relationships are in—or so goes conventional “postmodern” wisdom on how to transform society, at least among those who hold out hope that societal transformation is still possible,...

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Posted by on Sep 25, 2013 in Culture | 2 comments

Three Lessons for Evangelical Leaders

Three Lessons for Evangelical Leaders

Ross Douthat’s Bad Religion: How We Became a Nation of Heretics won Christianity Today’s 2013 “Best Book of the Year” award in “Christianity and Culture” for a reason. Check out this stunning quote, pasted on the back of the Fall 2013 Issue of Comment Magazine: “This turn boded ill for Evangelicalism’s long-term future, because although the ‘para’ groups were immensely successful at religious mobilization, they weren’t as effective at sustaining commitment across a life span or across generations. “They were institutions for an anti-institutional faith, you might say, which meant that they were organized around personalities and causes and rarely created the sense of comprehensive, intergenerational community…You couldn’t spend your whole life in Campus Crusade for Christ, or raise your daughters as a Promise Keeper, or count on groups like the Moral Majority of the Christian Coalition to sustain your belief system beyond the next election cycle. “For that kind of staying power, you needed a confessional tradition, a church, an institution capable of outlasting its charismatic founders.” As...

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