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Faith & Immigration (Op-Ed for the Boulder Weekly)

Posted by on Jan 21, 2021 in Politics, Work | 0 comments

by Jeff Haanen Scrolling through my Facebook feed, last week I noticed a rare delight: Edith Franco was beaming. Recently graduated with a masters degree, she posed in black cap and gown in front of the Texas State University sign smiling ear to ear.  Almost a decade ago I was her youth pastor at a small church in Brighton. Optimistic, kind and bright, Edith was the first to volunteer, the last to complain and she ran circles around her AP classes in high school. As I wondered where the time had went, I also worried for her: What will an undocumented immigrant do with all that potential?  This week...

Rethinking Your Retirement

Posted by on Jan 2, 2021 in retirement | 0 comments

What are the major concerns of people facing retirement? How does the “vacation” view of retirement contrast with what the Bible says about retirement? How important a dimension of retirement is Sabbath? What do you believe is the most important component of a godly retirement? What am I going to do with my retirement? I was recently interviewed by Paul Arnott, the executive director of Q4:Rethinking Retirement, on my book An Uncommon Guide to Retirement: Finding God’s Purpose for the Next Season of Life. Paul was a delightful, humble host. He exemplifies what it means to be an “elder” of influence and wisdom. I hope you enjoy this...

Why Faith & Work? (Pt. 1) – Gospel

Posted by on Dec 23, 2020 in Theology, Work | 0 comments

It was a Sunday afternoon. I walked out my back garage to toss the trash. I opened the green can, heaved in the white plastic bag, and breathed in … the stench of smoke. As I shut the can I moseyed out to my driveway to investigate. I looked up in the sky. The sun was a dull yellow, filtered through an unnatural cloud that covered the horizon. Smoke from the worst wildfires in Colorado history hung like a lingering ghost. Ash slowly fell around me and the street in my neighborhood was completely empty. As I turned to walk back inside I heard something. It was a song...

Why Give? Kahlil Gibran on Generosity

Posted by on Oct 28, 2020 in Nonprofit, Work | 0 comments

Crammed in my drawer next to my bed are years of arts and crafts, given to me with almost ecstatic anticipation by my four daughters over the years. A Beauty and the Beast coloring page; a blue, yellow, and green woven bracelet; a pink and yellow glazed pot, just perfect for a few coins. In each instance, my daughters worked, wrapped, and then gave gifts to their daddy out of a freedom, delight, and self-forgetfulness.  Like my daughters, Americans are generous. Yet Americans aren’t exactly joyful. Today 3 of 5 Americans report being lonely and 1 in 6 struggle with mental illness. During the pandemic, as we see philanthropic needs mount, some are skeptical that generosity...

What Is Denver Institute for Faith & Work?

Posted by on Oct 15, 2020 in Work | 0 comments

The following is a brief introduction to my work at Denver Institute for Faith & Work that I gave at a recent fundraiser. It first appeared on the DIFW website. It doesn’t take much to make the case that the world is deeply broken.  Even as you read this, my guess is that today – in your own experience – you can feel the fallenness of our culture all around. From anger and fear in the news to our day-to-day experience of broken relationships, we know that something is amiss.  As the executive director and founder of Denver Institute for Faith & Work, I, too, feel that something is deeply wrong...

How Should Christians Think About Politics? 11 Insights from Reinhold Neibuhr

Posted by on Aug 13, 2020 in Politics, Work | 0 comments

\ It’s hard to find the right metaphor for our current political moment. Are we in an echo chamber with megaphones? Are we, like a nuclear reaction, splitting atoms and roasting all our opponents? Or perhaps we’re more like vikings on social media: we land ashore, pillage and plunder all who oppose us, and then sail off once again to hang out with our village people. Whatever the metaphor, we’re in an election season, and the weight of pandemic-soaked culture is turning up the dial on every debate. How should people of Christian faith think about and respond to the politics of our day?  There are as many answers...